tales from the crypt keeper movie||CRYPTE SHOW FOR BETTER VAMPIRE

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5. IT HELPED CREATE THE “IT’S NOT TV, IT’S HBO” TAG.

Free from the restrictions of broadcast networks, HBO had no problems pushing boundaries in its content. When the channel enlisted a new ad agency to develop a marketing campaign for Tales from the Crypt, they screened a collection of racy footage from the show along with other original programming. When the lights came up, someone said, “It’s not TV.” Another person said, “No, it’s HBO.”

6. TWO VERSIONS OF EACH EPISODE WERE SHOT.

For Zemeckis, Donner, and the rest of the show’s high-profile producers, the financial payoff was always thought to be a move to syndication. Because HBO was more permissive in terms of content, they needed to prepare for an eventual screening on broadcast TV stations. When Tales from the Crypt was bought by Fox for a late-night Saturday slot in 1994, the episodes were re-edited to include alternate takes that eliminated most of the original episodes’ gore and nudity. The show also had actors loop non-profane dialogue during shooting. While HBO normally values exclusivity, it didn’t mind the deal: uncut episodes were still an attraction and, as one executive pointed out, “The show is called HBO’s Tales From the Crypt.” Free advertising never hurt.

7. THE AXE-WIELDING SANTA WAS SEEN BEFORE.

WickedHorror
One of the show’s earliest episodes featured Larry Drake (L.A. Law) as a murderous Santa Claus stalking a woman who had just murdered her husband and couldn’t exactly plead with the police for assistance. While the premise was based on an E.C. story, it wasn’t the first time it had been filmed. In 1972, a production company named Amicus released a Tales From the Crypt feature: in one segment, Joan Collins appears as the freshly widowed wife being hunted by a significantly less sinister-looking Santa.

8. JOHN KASSIR CALLED INTO RADIO SHOWS IN CHARACTER.

As an anthology show, Tales from the Crypt didn’t have any recurring cast members to help drum up publicity. The only familiar face (and voice) was Kassir’s. So HBO had him make the media rounds at the start of each season, calling into radio shows as the Crypt Keeper. “We would launch a new season and I would spend a week in the morning doing 50 or 60 radio interviews as the Crypt Keeper,” he told CrypticRock.com. “I would naturally have to improvise all of that. I would have some bullet points and all that to talk about when the show was coming on … [the Crypt Keeper] would sit there and talk. ‘How are you Frank? Ha ha ha.’”

9. IT MOVED TO THE UK FOR ITS FINAL SEASON.

And not, as some suspected, because it was cheaper. After six seasons, Tales from the Crypt had more or less exhausted California’s reserve of actors and filmmakers. For its final season, the production moved to Ealing Studios in West London. Producer Gil Adler endorsed the switch for enabling new faces and locations to be utilized. As a result of the change, Ewan McGregor and Bob Hoskins were among the actors who popped up on the series.

10. IT GOT G-RATED FOR AN ANIMATED SERIES.

Zaki’s Corner
The success of Tales from the Crypt in live-action prompted Silver to consider alternative revenue streams for its popular host, who once sat in with The Tonight Show band. In 1993, ABC aired a Saturday morning cartoon show, Tales From the Cryptkeeper, that featured a somewhat softer approach to the morbid material: characters didn’t die, and being dismembered was off-limits. Originally intended to be introduced by the puppet version, concerns over his appearance—the Crypt Keeper is essentially a rotting corpse, which might disturb children—led producers to replace him with an animated substitute. John Kassir remained the voice. The light alternative didn’t resonate with viewers, who tuned out after two seasons.

11. IT ALSO GOT REWORKED AS A GAME SHOW.

The unwieldy title was probably a fair warning: Secrets of the Crypt Keeper’s Haunted House was a 1996 production that featured Kassir and his puppet alter ego in a game show that aired on CBS on Saturday mornings. Shot at Universal Studios Florida, teams of contestants awkwardly interacted with a green screen and 1990s-era computer graphics while the Crypt Keeper taunted them. The effects were so peculiar that the show’s premiere was delayed by a month while technical difficulties were sorted out. It lasted a season, but that was enough to make some kind of TV history: by this point, the character had appeared on ABC, CBS, Fox, and HBO.

12. THERE WAS ALSO A CHRISTMAS ALBUM.

Reminded that Freddy Krueger once performed with the Fat Boys, Kassir recorded several albums in character for Warner Bros. The first, Have Yourself a Scary Little Christmas, was released in 1994. (Sample track: “Deck the Halls with Parts of Charlie.”) Kassir has said his father, a surgeon, enjoyed playing the holiday record during procedures.

July 18, 2016 – 6:00pm

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